Most of the books published by the American Concrete Institute are anything but fundamental — highly technical, in-depth advice is what sets ACI apart. But there’s also a place for the basics and two new publications fill that need. The Concrete Craftsman Series of books started more than 30 years ago and now there’s one brand new one, Placing and Finishing Decorative Concrete Flatwork (CCS-5), and an updated version of Concrete Fundamentals (CCS-0). Both have nice color photography and are organized to help those who want to understand the basics and don’t really need all the details.

Infrastructure Challenges

“I don’t think it’s any secret that we have challenges in regard to aging infrastructure,” said Kryton CEO Kari Yuers in an interview at CC Live during the World of Concrete. This in-depth discussion, available now on video, explores the frustration of politicians pledging money during elections and then not delivering and looks at why some spending is more effective. “If the system isn’t in place to get the money to where it needs to be, then we’re not going to get it built,” she said. “And we have aging infrastructure which is a safety issue and a cost issue because everything escalates and then it’s not a maintenance program — it’s a replacement program which increases the cost for everybody.” See the full video conversation.

Staining for Success

If you ever have or ever intend to acid stain a floor, you’ve got to read Steve VandeWater’s article in Concrete Surfaces' March issue. Steve is a former decorative concrete contractor who now runs his own concrete supply house in Fishers, Ind., and our regular decorative concrete columnist. He noticed that the sealer on some of his stained floors was peeling away and even taking some of the stain color with it. Since acid stains are in the surface layer of concrete, that didn’t make any sense. Check out his article for the surprisingly simple solution.


Shelby Mitchell (left), one of our former editors and now a consultant, and Lauren Hunter, our videographer extraordinaire, toured the show from dawn to dusk for three days to capture a sense of WOC.
Shelby Mitchell (left), one of our former editors and now a consultant, and Lauren Hunter, our videographer extraordinaire, toured the show from dawn to dusk for three days to capture a sense of WOC.

Live from WOC

Whether you attended the World of Concrete this year or not, you couldn’t possibly have seen everything. From the North Hall to the South Hall, from the Silver Lot to the Gold Lot, there are exhibits and demos and contests. Luckily, we shot lots of video during the show so you can catch up on what you missed. Shelby Mitchell, one of our former editors and now a consultant, and Lauren Hunter, our videographer extraordinaire, toured the show from dawn to dusk for three days to capture a sense of WOC. To see all of the videos, go to www.concreteconstruction.net/videos.