Back view of businessman sitting in front of laptop screen. Man typing on a modern laptop in an office.
Young student typing on computer sitting at wooden table.
Back view of businessman sitting in front of laptop screen. Man typing on a modern laptop in an office. Young student typing on computer sitting at wooden table.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) recently released their final ruling on workplace illness and injury which aims to "modernize injury data collection" by requiring companies to electronically submit all work-related illnesses and injuries to OSHA. This new ruling will require companies to send this data to OSHA, something they are require collect but previously volunteered to turnover.

Until now OSHA had little information on these issues available to them despite the Bureau of Labor Statistics recording more than three million workers suffer from a workplace injury or illness every year.

Some such as the National Association of Home Builders and the (NAHB) and U.S. Chamber of Commerce predict negative outcomes coming from this ruling such as under reporting or believe it to be a violation of constitutional mandates. However, OSHA is standing by their decision:

OSHA counters that the rule gives more license for employees to report injuries and illnesses without fear of retaliation. Plus, employers are now required to have a procedure in place for employees to report workplace illness and injuries that do not intimidate or discourage workers from reporting.

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