Sparkling black concrete welcomes the footsteps of thousands at the entrance plaza of the Hayden Planetarium in New York City. In Houston, graceful white ferrocement "leaves" filter the harsh Texas sunlight to permit comfortable daylight viewing of art objects in the Menil Collection.

WHITE CONCRETE AT THE MUSEUM

The Menil Collection in Houston houses about 10,000 works under a unique concrete roof/ceiling. Elegant ferrocement "leaves" baffle the dazzling Texas sunlight and cover the galleries with a modern Gothic vaulting. These leaves are of a varying thickness, cast in ferrocement and attached to a truss system of ductile iron. The leaves are 37.5 feet long, cast using a mix of white aggregate and cement. The structural design required extreme accuracy in placing of mesh reinforcement particularly along the tail of the leaf where the thickness is only 1 1/4 inches.

BLACK CONCRETE AT THE PLANETARIUM

Concrete serves as a background for art in the Celestial Plaza entrance to the Hayden Planetarium at the Museum of Natural History in New York City. The plaza consists of bronze sculpture embedded into dark concrete enhanced by sparkling silicon carbide.