Major categories of accidents in forming and shoring activities are: falling from one level to another; being hit by falling objects; improper lifting practices. These general hazards as well as hazards associated with particular forming systems are discussed. Recommendations are given to minimize the risks associated with the numerous hazards.

WHY ARE FALLS SO FREQUENT?

Concrete formworkers often work at the upper reaches of a building where no structural members are available as anchorage for safety lines. Until the last form is put into place or the last sheet of plywood is laid, there are openings in the deck.

PREVENTING FALLS DURING DECK FORM ERECTION

Walking a 4-inch beam located 10, 12, or 20 feet in the air may seem easy to some workers, but it's definitely not safe. The safer way to erect stringers is to work from stable ladders or scaffolding.

HOLES AND OPENINGS

Elevator shafts and core walls present another problem. Guardrails are not too practical at the working levels of the deck because the wall-form workers must go beyond the guardrails to do their work. It is more practical to cover the openings.

INJURIES CAUSED BY FALLING OBJECTS

Being hit by falling objects is the second largest category of construction accidents. Material is constantly being put up, taken down, and moved horizontally. The areas to which materials are moved are not completely decked over, nor is all material immediately fastened to what is already in place. Thus, the potential for falling material is great. Tradespeople not aware of the dangers of form stripping should be kept out by a warning rope strung around the stripping area.