The central core of the Solar Tube home is reinforced concrete. It absorbs and stores the sun's warmth, keeping the temperature of the living spaces comfortable.
The central core of the Solar Tube home is reinforced concrete. It absorbs and stores the sun's warmth, keeping the temperature of the living spaces comfortable.

A groundbreaking exhibition, “The Green House: New Directions in Sustainable Architecture and Design” reveals the trends in green technology, materials, and design, yielding homes that are as aesthetically compelling as they are environmentally friendly. Featuring an international survey of 20 contemporary residences by architects such as American William Mc-Donough, Australian Peter Carmichael, and German Werner Sobek— plus a full-size, furnished version of architect Michelle Kaufmann's Glidehouse —The Green House answers key questions: What makes a home or product green? How is a green home healthier, safer, and more comfortable? What are the costs of going green?

A computer allows Green House visitors to compare home energy costs. Also, the Portland Cement Association (PCA) developed a touch-screen computer system displayed at the exhibition that shows how the building materials used to construct the exterior walls impact energy efficiency and comfort. It takes into account house size and geographical location to determine which type home construction provides the lowest annual energy use.

The exhibition will be on view until June 3, 2007 at The National Building Museum, 401 F Street NW, Washington, DC.