Median weekly earnings of the 109.1 million workers employed full-time in the U.S. rose to $830 in the first quarter of 2016, according to the Usual Weekly Earnings of Wage and Salary Workers report released by U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) Tuesday morning. The release is based off data (not seasonally adjusted) collected from the Current Population Survey, a nationwide sample survey conducted by the BLS.

Among 5.5 million full-time employees in construction and extraction occupations, median weekly earnings increased to $772 in the first quarter of 2016, a $4 gain year-over-year. This is the third consecutive year that median weekly earnings increased year-over-year, a sign of the slow, yet stable ongoing recovery from the recession.

The gender pay gap is significant among employees in construction and extraction occupations, with the median weekly wage for female employees ($519) only accounting for 66.9% of the weekly wage for male employees, recorded as $776 in the first quarter of 2016. However, male workers still greatly outnumber female workers in construction and extraction occupations, which may be skewing the median wage recorded for males. A total of 119,000 women work construction and extraction occupations, only representing 2.2% of the total workforce.

Full-time workers in installation, maintenance, and repair occupations earned a median weekly wage of $880 in this quarter, a 3.8% growth from a year earlier. Median weekly earnings of male workers in related occupations rose to $886 in the same quarter, while those of women declined by -9.3% to $683, leading to a larger gender gap in installation, maintenance, and repair occupations.

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