Dominick Cardone's work is a complicated mix of decorative materials made with stencils, solvent dyes, epoxies, color-shift metallic powders, overlay cement, and metal leaf.
Dominick Cardone's work is a complicated mix of decorative materials made with stencils, solvent dyes, epoxies, color-shift metallic powders, overlay cement, and metal leaf.

Cardone began his concrete career as a young boy working with his father, a concrete flatwork contractor, and continued through high school. At 19, he started his own company. When he learned what a competitive business flatwork was, he turned to renovation work in Manhattan, where a client asked him to install a stone counter-top. Cardone persuaded him to try concrete, promising to replace it if the client wasn't satisfied. His company soon grew into a full-fledged decorative contractor. Those who lived through 9/11 in New York City experienced life-changing emotions, and Cardone's work at the Artistry Demo reflected that. His tribute was a complicated mix of stencils, acetone-based dyes, 100% solid epoxies, color-shift metallic powders sandwiched between layers of epoxy, overlay cement, and metal leaf. Because of the low ambient temperatures, he tented and heated his work in order to set the epoxies. With volunteer help (his wife Janine and employee Thomas Iazetta) he troweled, painted, rolled, used a turkey baster, and sprayed with a high-volume low-pressure (HVLP) sprayer to complete the work.