Experts do not believe a wider adoption of encapsulation would present problems on the jobsite. Here’s what a few said:

  • “Encapsulation is quite simple in terms of field requirements,” said Cary Kopczynski, , P.E., S.E., and CEO of Cary Kopczynski & Co. “Many of the components show up in the field preassembled: the sleeve to protect the exposed cable inside of the anchor, the epoxy or plastic coating on the anchor and sheathing of proper thickness, which is already required to be 50 mm. It is easy and cheap.”
  • “The requirements will include tendon finishing, cutting the tail, encapsulating by installing a cap and grouting the pocket. There will be that impact. But PT has been around for a long time,” said Russell Price, P.E. and executive vice president of Suncoast Post Tension Ltd., who adds that it is already the norm on the jobsites he sees.
  • “Encapsulation will require a few more parts and critical training, but nothing significant,” said Randall Poston, P.E. and principal at WDP & Associates.
  • “Encapsulation will call for an increase in inspections to assure field quality,” said Asit Baxi, P.E. and owner of Baxi Engineering, ?a post-tensioned concrete specialty engineering firm.
  • Interviewees also speculated that new encapsulated anchor systems will be brought to market in response to changing practices. “People will solve any installation issue,” said Rashid Ahmed, P.E. and vice president of Walker Parking Consultants. “Creative suppliers in the PT industry will come up with improved quality products as well as improved methods of installation,” added Kline.
  • The number of personnel on the jobsite may increase slightly, stated several interviewees.