Q.: What's the easiest way to measure the extent and magnitude of floor curling on a very large warehouse floor? Is there a standard method for measuring curling?

A.: We know of no standard method. We've heard of several approaches, but the numerical values obtained will be different for each approach. You can use a device intended to measure F-numbers, and a graph showing elevation vs. distance will reveal points at which curling has occurred. We've also heard of using a leveled 10-foot-long beam centered on the curled section and measuring to the floor surface at each end. You could also use an optical or laser level and take shots at joints and the floor surface a few feet from the joint at random locations.

Floor consultant Armand Gustaferro told us he surveyed 900,000 square feet of floor by using a 4-foot-long carpenter's level. At about 140 random joint locations, he used the level two different ways. At some locations he centered the level so it was perpendicular to the joint chosen. Then he pushed one end down, measured the distance from the other end to the floor, and halved it. At other locations he centered the level at the intersection of two joints but placed it at a 45-degree angle to the joints. Then he pushed one end down, measured the distance from the other end to the floor, and halved it. Average curling height measured at the joint intersections was about one-third greater than the average height measured across the joints.