Q.: When the Americans with Disabilities Act went into effect in 1992, it required detectable warnings on walking surfaces of ramps to help sight-impaired people. The detectable warnings were to consist of closely spaced, raised, truncated domes about an inch in diameter and 0.2 inch high. Are these warnings still required for concrete surfaces?

A.: The part of the ADA requiring detectable warnings has been suspended for some time. The Federal Register 63, no. 225 (23 November 1998):64, 836 contains the following joint final rule:

"The Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board (Access Board), the Department of Justice, and the Department of Transportation are continuing the suspension of the requirements for detectable warnings at curb ramps, hazardous vehicular areas, and reflecting pool edges in the Americans with Disabilities Act Accessibility Guidelines (ADAAG) and the Standards for Accessible Design. The Access Board plans to issue a separate notice of proposed rule making to revise and update ADAAG and will address detectable warnings in that rule making. The Department of Justice and the Department of Transportation will issue separate notices of proposed rulemaking to revise and update the Standards for Accessible Design, which must be consistent with ADAAG. The agencies are continuing the suspension of the detectable warning requirements to July 26, 2001, when it is expected that the rulemakings to revise and update ADAAG and the Standards for Accessible Design will be completed."