Concrete Runway Expansion

Six parallel tunnels use driven precast piles, cast-in-place continuous walls and footings, individual pile caps, columns and pier caps, and deck beams. The structure must meet tunnel codes for ventilation, fire sprinklers, and lighting.

Surrounding highways and residential development prevented the airport from expanding outward. An existing airstrip had to be extended to span over the highway/rail corridor.

Bidwell placing machine followed by work bridge. The machine was stretched to 180 feet wide to place the full bridge span parallel to the crown of the runway centerline.

Precast, prestressed beams were constructed both in the on-site yard and by outside precast vendors.

Galvanized metal decking 2-1/2 inches deep spans between prestressed beams. They are permanent, “stay in place” (SIP) forms. The contractor had the option to install and remove plywood forms.

The taxiway had less loading so a more efficient pier and pier cap solution was used.

Casting of continuous runway walls adjacent to railroad tracks. The busy railroad could not be shut down at all during construction. “We had to coordinate with the railroad flagman for our vehicles to cross the tracks,” says Hernandez.

Runway deck pour in progress. The 500,000-square-foot deck sits atop six parallel tunnels accommodating the highway/railroad corridor. The concrete placing machine was stretched to 180 feet wide to place the full bridge span parallel to the crown of the runway centerline.

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