Revisiting a Concrete Overlay

The pavement shows some signs of age but no distress. Whitetopping is still “the flexible solution” and as an industry, we need to deliver the message.

Twenty four years later, the lot is still in use and except for a few utility cuts, some patches for unrelated work, and a small full-depth concrete expansion outside the limits of our project, the overlay is performing well. The lot exhibits no signs of degradation, potential failure, or even required maintenance.

Twenty four years after installation , the lot is still in use and except for a few utility cuts, some patches for unrelated work, and a small full-depth concrete expansion outside the limits of our project, the overlay is performing well.

Concrete contractors will appreciate that during initial construction over the 3 acres, there was one 5-foot-long random crack. As days often go in this industry, this crack was in the superintendent’s designated parking space. We epoxy-injected that crack and today it looks the same as it did 24 years ago.

Whitetopping was and is a competitive and viable alternative to asphalt, even though the American Concrete Pavement Association doesn’t even use the term whitetopping anymore, opting for simply calling it an overlay, either bonded or unbonded.

The overlay remains in excellent condition after 24 years.

Telling the owner that the lot would have a 20- to 30-year life was perhaps an understatement.

Joints were sawed with an early-entry saws and left unsealed.

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