A new small shot-blast machine did the profile work.
Joe Nasvik A new small shot-blast machine did the profile work.

Foreman is also a partner in Apex Concrete Designs whose principal decorative product is stamped concrete. He started AK-4 a couple of years ago to focus on diamond polished concrete. He says that he did this because their number one issue was sealers and coatings and he saw this as a way to solve the problem. He started by polishing countertops and densifying them with liquid hardeners, later moving to floor polishing using the same approach as with countertops.

Foreman diamond polished a floor slab to a 3000-grit finish. The stenciled border pattern was profiled and filled with epoxy loaded with brass powder. Several dye colors also were added to provide additional color.
Joe Nasvik Foreman diamond polished a floor slab to a 3000-grit finish. The stenciled border pattern was profiled and filled with epoxy loaded with brass powder. Several dye colors also were added to provide additional color.

Artistry presenters try out new ideas at the demos—that's what creativity is all about. In an effort to provide a more interesting look than just polishing a slab, it was decided to create a border pattern using a stencil. Foreman used a new light-profile tool recently introduced by Blastrac to blast a 1/8-inch-deep profile through the stencil, filling the relief with epoxy heavily loaded with very fine brass powder. Two passes over the stencil were needed to achieve the right depth. The first pass left a well-defined impression. The second pass caused some erosion under stencil edges and loosened the stencil in many places. It was decided that a heavier stencil material and a stronger adhesive would perform better the next time. After the epoxy hardened, it was diamond polished to the same flatness as the rest of the slab, creating the look of polished brass. Foreman also added several dye colors to the slab, adding more interest to the rest of the slab.