Mike Miller focused on concrete as an art form, using colored overlay cement to recreate Aboriginal art and diamond-polishing the hard overlay cement to produce a smooth, lustrous finish.
Mike Miller focused on concrete as an art form, using colored overlay cement to recreate Aboriginal art and diamond-polishing the hard overlay cement to produce a smooth, lustrous finish.

Concrete Construction magazine has credited Miller as the person who most influenced the variability that chemical stains now offer. Before Miller, specifiers tended to expect monochromatic, flat color representations. Today, Miller and his partner Kelly Burnham (a presenter at the 2003 Artistry Demo) advocate using concrete as an artistic medium the way that other artists would paint on canvas. To illustrate this point, at the Artistry Demo Miller applied colored overlay cements to canvas. On a recent trip to Australia he became fascinated with Aboriginal art and made this his subject, applying colored overlay cements with margin trowels, squeeze bottles, and putty knives. His first step was a thin trowel-down application of black overlay cement. Then he laid out a grid to transfer his ideas from sketches. After applying several colored overlay cements, he diamond-polished the work with a hand-held planetary grinder. The final result was a flat, lustrous finish.