Gasser demonstrates what can be done with old, worn slabs that might be considered past their usefulness. He used epoxy, stains, overlay cements, and decorative grinding.
Joe Nasvik  Gasser demonstrates what can be done with old, worn slabs that might be considered past their usefulness. He used epoxy, stains, overlay cements, and decorative grinding.

Involved in the concrete industry for more than 45 years and architectural and decorative concrete for 35 years, many refer to Gasser as one of the grandfathers of the decorative movement. He says he made his first concrete stamps in 1974 out of angle iron before moving on to urethane stamps and texture mats. Major accomplishments include Sleeping Beauty's Castle for Euro Disney and conducting seminars in England, South Africa, and California. Now at 61, he says, “I have a never ending love for this material and I'm not afraid to make mistakes either. A lot of mistakes with concrete lead you to breakthrough.” His artistry demo explores some of that philosophy.

For the demo he started by breaking the ends off two sides of his slab with a chipping hammer. Then with diamond cup grinding heads on angle grinders he and his helpers ground down part of the top of his slab near the broken edges, leaving uneven surfaces. Then they cut patterns in the rest of the slab, coloring them with “liquid metal” colors and chemical stains. Over the ground down portions of his slab, he used stencils to provide pattern, building up the exposed parts with overlay cement to make 3-D shapes.