Inset: Shellie Rigsby and Jack Holland use “wasps” to etch the design on the adhesive paper onto the concrete surface. Left: Rigsby's work reflects a wide range of decorative techniques and tools.
Inset: Shellie Rigsby and Jack Holland use “wasps” to etch the design on the adhesive paper onto the concrete surface. Left: Rigsby's work reflects a wide range of decorative techniques and tools.

Rigsby's ambitious demo used a wide variety of materials and equipment. The project included adhesive stencils, images copied onto adhesive-backed paper plastic templates with ornate designs cut in, liquid resist applied through templates, chemical stains, powdered pigments, garden fertilizer, coffee grounds, and thin overlay cements. She used a variety of tools, including a “wasp”—an air-driven vibrating point that is held like a pen and scars the surface of concrete. Some areas were sand-blasted with equipment that picked up the effluent. Rigsby and her teammates, Kemper York, Maria Holland, and Jack Holland, spent all the available time creating four different layers of designs in the finished work: one cut into the concrete surface, one on the surface, and two layers of overlays above the surface.

View other 2005 Artistry in Concrete participants.