Taylor-Clark uses microtoppings similar to how an artist would paint on canvas. They provide the color and resistance to wear (with sealer) that allow her to do mural work on floor surfaces.
Joe Nasvik Taylor-Clark uses microtoppings similar to how an artist would paint on canvas. They provide the color and resistance to wear (with sealer) that allow her to do mural work on floor surfaces.

Taylor-Clark started her company in 1999 to do furniture painting and quickly graduated to lime plasters and cementitious materials to complete her current frescos and artwork. Tamara comes from the art world and therefore doesn't place concrete or do any kind of structural work. “I often use overlay concrete in lieu of plaster,” she says. Tamara does just as much teaching as she completes projects for consignment. Her work takes her to all parts of the United States. “I am a company of one,” she says. “If needed, I will hire local people in the cities where my projects are located and train them to do the work.” Her projects include both commercial and residential, where she specializes in floors, walls, and countertops. She sometimes uses stencils on floors to make them look like they have carpets on them or freehand artwork for other applications.

For her demo, Taylor-Clark used colored microtopping overlay cement—first to provide a base color for the slab, and then used it as a painter would use paint on a canvas to create the artwork. Although the sky and moon were applied with a trowel, the cranes were handpainted with cement and brushes.