To create a shower stall, Todd Seaboch applied several thin applications of overlay cement over cement-based backer board, colored it with water-based stains, and sealed with urethanes for a waterproof, easy-to-maintain finish.
To create a shower stall, Todd Seaboch applied several thin applications of overlay cement over cement-based backer board, colored it with water-based stains, and sealed with urethanes for a waterproof, easy-to-maintain finish.

Seaboch grew up in the decorative concrete industry, having spent 18 years working with concrete. He learned his craft from a company that specialized in decorative resurfacing. Five years ago he decided to start his own company, specializing in custom residential work. His company installs concrete showers and precast countertops, stairways, fireplaces, windowsills, and moldings. Seaboch decided to make a decorative concrete shower stall for his demo because such stalls are becoming more popular. Starting with a wood frame wall and a cement-based backer board, he applied several thin applications of overlay cement. In a normal application he would install a waterproof membrane between the overlay and the cement board. He outlined the wall design with reinforced tape and used water-based stains to pattern and color his work. Afterwards he sanded the wall lightly and applied a waterproof sealer. Seaboch also uses stencils to add patterning to shower stalls