Schrunk and Lockwood worked together to construct a patterned formliner wall, which they colored with water-based stains. As the light moves and changes, the planes of the pattern cause the work to reflect the shapes and color differently.
Schrunk and Lockwood worked together to construct a patterned formliner wall, which they colored with water-based stains. As the light moves and changes, the planes of the pattern cause the work to reflect the shapes and color differently.

Schrunk is a professional artist and craftsman interested in lustrous materials and how light reflects off them. One of his clients is the Steinway Piano Company. He is one of only a few to have been asked to do the highest level of inlay woodwork on more than one piano for Stein-way and is listed on their Web site. While doing inlay work he began to notice how light reflects off wood grain patterns, which led him to wonder about patterning concrete in a way that would reflect light. He currently has a patent pending for the patterning effect that comes from reflected light and its basic shift when it moves across the surface of an object. For the Artistry Demo, Schrunk teamed up with Lockwood, an experienced decorative concrete contractor. Lockwood is currently marketing Schrunk's system to DOTs in the northeast region of the country. Together, they designed a vertical panel to illustrate the concept, using self-consolidating concrete (SCC) to fill the form. The following day they applied water-based stains to add color to their work.