Low-rise

The Caribbean island of Curacao is home to 130,000 people, but it sees more than half a million visitors each year. The Hotel Renaissance is being built by the Manhattan Construction Co. to meet the demands of the growing tourism industry. Four stories high, the 75,000-square-foot hotel will include 240 guest rooms, a restaurant, a shopping complex, a movie theatre, and a casino when it opens in December 2007.

The contractor used MevaDec formwork on a six-day cycle to build this four-story hotel.
Meva The contractor used MevaDec formwork on a six-day cycle to build this four-story hotel.

Meva Formwork Systems, Springfield, Ohio, provided local construction company Curcon B.V. with MevaDec—an aluminum panel system—and Meva table forms to build the hotel decks. Because the panels don't need to be assembled on a traditional rigid grid, the forms can change direction, making them easily adaptable to any building layout.

The formwork is so easy to use and portable that each 3280-square-foot slab is being constructed on a six-day cycle. The shores that support the formwork during concrete placement and curing stay in place to support the concrete deck after the panels are removed, allowing the next higher floor to be formed and poured as the slab continues to gain strength.

Mid-rise

Roller Deck forming system is designed for projects such as Le Meridien with a repetitive stacking design.
Symons Roller Deck forming system is designed for projects such as Le Meridien with a repetitive stacking design.

Block E in downtown Minneapolis, completed in 2002, spans an entire block and houses retail shops, an 18-screen movie theatre, and the 13-story Le Meridien Minneapolis hotel. The lower levels of the complex used steel frame construction, but the Adjustable Joist Co., Hopkins, Minn., was contracted to build the upper hotel levels using cast-in-place concrete.

The standard floor design consisted of five bays, with the two bays on each end having columns that were directly in line with each other. This led form-work supplier Symons, Des Plaines, Ill., to recommend its Roller Deck system for those areas. Designed for elevated decks in repetitive multistory buildings, the system consists of heavy-duty steel components in combination with laminated wood I-joists that allow clear spans up to 26 feet with a slab depth up to 8 inches without shoring.

The system's column-mounted adjustable anchor clamps are engineered to support a 50,000-pound working load. Steel stringers transfer the concrete load to the anchor brackets during the pour. After the concrete is placed, portable roller assemblies are placed between the jack head and stringers so tables can easily be rolled. Hinged guardrail posts allow removal from either end.

The more complex center bay contained the elevator, mechanical shafts, and opening for the concrete pump. The crane blocked access on one side of the building; crews couldn't maneuver the large forms. Symons proposed using three small aluminum truss sections for this bay. Two of the truss tables were inserted by crane and moved with a dolly. Aluminum beams connected the two tables.

High-rise

Perini Building Company Inc. of Las Vegas is one of the largest hotel and casino builders in the nation. Now, with a $370 million construction contract, it is adding the Trump International Hotel and Tower Las Vegas to its résumé, which already includes Paris Las Vegas, the Luxor Hotel and Casino, and the Renaissance Las Vegas. When completed in 2008, the tower will be 64 stories and 640 feet tall, towering over the Vegas strip.

EFCO's formwork helped save time and money in the Trump Tower Las Vegas.
EFCO Corp. EFCO's formwork helped save time and money in the Trump Tower Las Vegas.

Perini partnered with EFCO, Des Moines, Iowa, to develop a concrete forming solution using EFCO's Power Tower self-climbing forming system. The project's design requires a crane to place large cages of reinforcing steel. The overhead beam design—which provides a working platform at one level and support for the inside and outside wall forms—enables crews to install rebar cages two stories high, which eliminates half the rebar couplers on the job.

The system's hinged corner design allows the couplers to be located at any point within the wall. Inside and outside form panels can be rolled back 3 feet giving workers enough space to install the rebar couplers with wrenches at the splice. In addition, the overhead beam system was designed and supplied to support and move the concrete placing boom at the same time as the forms.

Perini used Adjust-A-Deck—a column-supported system designed to handle spans up to 34 feet wide—for the slab work. The deck occupies 1680 square feet, which is moved with one crane pick. Shoring, and, in most cases, reshoring, is unnecessary.