Workers bend the #6 spiral for the pier columns on the Canada Line.
Don Shahan Workers bend the #6 spiral for the pier columns on the Canada Line.

Rebar bending and cutting on a jobsite can be a difficult and laborious job. With the right tool, however, it can be less taxing on the operator. Held and operated with just a single hand and with the ability to rotate 360 degrees, the EZE Bend Bender can be used for production fabrication or at the point of rebar installation.

Harris Rebar in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, was contracted for the rebar portion of the Canada Line, formerly known as the Richmond-Airport-Vancouver Line—a new 11.8-mile-long rapid-transit line of the South Coast British Columbia Transportation Authority (TransLink) in Metro Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. According to Don Shahan, project manager for Harris Rebar, “Using the EZE Bender definitely made the bending process more consistent throughout the project.” The project consisted of 300 columns, and with the EZE Bender, Harris Rebar was able to save 1 to 1½ hours of labor per column.

The design for the project called for a 135-degree bend on the 20M (#6 rebar) spiral into the center of the column. “Without this bender, we would have to bend the spiral by hand with a rebar hickey and the project would not look as good as with the use of the bender,” says Shahan.

Harris Rebar purchased the bender about three years ago and uses it on a regular basis. “We own the #8 pull bender. This machine has been of great service to us and we use it regularly to bend #6 and #8 rebar,” Shahan continues.

One worker completed the bending of the #6 spiral where it would have taken two workers if done by hand.
Don Shahan One worker completed the bending of the #6 spiral where it would have taken two workers if done by hand.

The bender also can be used for other applications. Harris Rebar has used it on the jobsite for bending dowels. Shahan says sometimes column dowels need to be bent into a slab. This may be caused by a change of design, a bad layout, or detail error. When this happens and the column bars are too big to bend by hand, it requires the use of a mechanical bender. “We have used the bender extensively for this purpose,” Shahan says. Using this bender for bending over column vertical bars also protects the already poured column below. Bending the column bars by hand with a hickey and sledge hammer can bend the bar at the poured concrete height, causing the concrete to crack and chip off. Shahan says, “Hundreds of man-hours were saved, and to say the least, the EZE Bender has been of great service to us at Harris Rebar and we would recommend its use to any rebar placer.”

Harris' work on the Canada Line was completed in spring of 2008. The completion of the transit line is set for November 2009 and it's expected to carry 100,000 passengers per day at launch and 142,000 passengers per day by 2021.