As a member of the construction industry since 1970, Dennis Lura often found himself traveling to big jobs up to 50 miles away with only a small crew at his disposal. Few concrete contractors Lura was familiar with would travel the distance and Lura found himself dealing with people he didn't know and couldn't depend on.

A wide variety of attachments, such as a CV joint, a wall plug, a wet screed attachment, and a circular pour attachment, make the screed customizable for any pour.
Dennis Lura A wide variety of attachments, such as a CV joint, a wall plug, a wet screed attachment, and a circular pour attachment, make the screed customizable for any pour.

Five years ago, Lura took it upon himself to build a roller screed suitable for large jobs, yet one that a small crew could handle. Other contractors who borrowed the screed were impressed and urged Lura to take it to the marketplace. Thus, the Lightning Strike roller screed by Lura Enterprises was born.

With its ability to screed areas from 4 to 40 feet, Lura's screed addresses the gray area that often is neglected between where a 2x4 screed stops (usually around 15 feet) and where the truss screed picks up (around 20 feet), says Lura.

The light weight of the screed—only 4¼ pounds per foot, or 85 pounds for a 20-foot section—allows for easy transportation. Two people can transport it with a pickup truck equipped with a rack, as opposed to the traditional heavier truss screed that requires a job trailer to transport.

When Jonathan Nelson, foreman and partner of Moorhead, Minn.-based Camrud Foss Concrete Construction, was introduced to the Lura concrete screed, he and his crew were skeptical. After a demonstration, though, Nelson was impressed by its mobility and versatility, particularly in tight places, and purchased the screed. Nelson and his crew now use it for a wide variety of applications, including basement and garage floors, driveways, sidewalks, pole shed slabs, and parking lots.

The crew likes the screed because of its simplicity and ability to reverse to rescreed an area. Laborers don't have to worry nearly as much about keeping the concrete precisely raked in front of the screed either—it easily backs up to fill holes. “Finishers don't have to work as hard to get a nice product,” says Nelson.

Its versatility and array of attachments accommodate uphill, pervious, and circular pours, and exposed aggregate. Compared to a truss screed, which shakes the mud down on uphill jobs, the Lightning Strike screed easily pulls mud uphill. One contractor who poured a 24-foot-wide hill found Lura's screed to be the only one that could efficiently complete the job.