A vision that seemed overwhelming at first was in the end, art you can walk on. This was Floor Seasons' first government project with the Parks and Recreations Division as well as a historical project for Nevada. One of the concepts was earth, wind, and fire. Using chemical stains, each element was distinguished by cutting lines into the concrete in various widths, which led the way to each of the elements pavilion. Once in each pavilion, visitors interact with displays that demonstrate how that element affects and works with Red Rock.

In the earth pavilion, four colors were chosen to represent the rocks that are indigenous to the region. On top, the words, "Native People" and "Burrows," as well as an 8-foot-long snake were carved into the structure. In the fire pavilion, terra cotta stain was used and flames were cut in after it was sealed to give it some extra life. The wind pavilion simple two large swirls featured two shades of blue. In addition, a 150-foot sidewalk leading to a large 22-foot-diameter circle was completed. Leading up to the sidewalk, petroglyphs, including a rabbit, turtle, snake, and a lizard, were etched simply with black stain, giving them a silhouette look. Finishing off the project is a map of the historical trails in Red Rock on the circle.

Designer's Perspective

The Red Rock Visitor's Center in Las Vegas was a historical project for Nevada as well as for Floor Seasons. An interactive and well-designed visitor center has been in the works for awhile, to have a testament to Red Rocks' beautiful scenery.

This was Floor Seasons' first government project with the Parks & Recreation division. We were invited to be apart of the design early on. Their vision of the space was overwhelming to say the least. We were embraced as masters in our field and were asked about the best ways to get to their vision. Once every detail was discussed, we came up with the game plan to begin our scope of work.

We cut a lot of the art in very early to cut down on the dust upon the finished product, plus it also allowed us to keep our eyes on the progress of the project. One of the concepts was earth, wind, and fire. Our involvement with this concept was at each element's starting point, we cut in lines into the concrete in various widths, which led the way to each of the elements pavilion. Once in each pavilion, there is a lot of interactive information on how that element affects and works with Red Rock.

Each element was done using Scofiled Lithochrome Chemstain and in some areas accented with Scofield's amazing Tinturas. In the earth pavilion, four colors were chosen to represent the rocks that are indigenous to the Red Rock region. On top of those four rock representations, we carved the words "Native People," "Burrows," and an 8-foot-long snake. The detail that was translated to the concrete, regarding the snake, was amazing. Various stains were used to be as true to the snake's colors in life. After sealing it, all of the meticulous scaling of the snake was cut in to remove the stain to make it pop more like pinstriping.

In the fire pavilion, we used Faded Terra Cotta stain and cut in flames after it was sealed to give it some extra life. The wind pavilion was simple and classic as well. It has two large swirls that were two shades of blue.

Another piece we got to do was a 150-foot sidewalk leading to a large 22-foot-diameter circle. Leading up the sidewalk, we put in some petroglyphs, such as a rabbit, turtle, snake, and a lizard, using just black stain as if it were a silhouette. On the circle, we did a map of the historical trails in Red Rock. It was a very enjoyable piece to do having all of Red Rock's beauty surrounding us during the install.

All in all, it was a historical project to be a part of and it will e great to know that when tens of thousands of visitors enjoy the beauty of Red Rock, our tagline will be in effect: art you can walk on.