Compensation

Advice for Hiring
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Advice for Hiring

The companies that have been most proactive and have already streamlined their... More

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S.D. Roads, You Get What You Pay For

New U.S. housing starts and permits unexpectedly rebounded in February, according to data on Tuesday that provided a rare dose of good news for the recession-hit economy and fractured housing market. More

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Cemex in Trouble

Mexico's Cemex, the world's third largest cement maker, said on Thursday that it still aims to issue $500 million in bonds internationally to help pay maturing debt, but its stock fell amid worries the company is struggling to sell the bonds. More

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Working for free

Most of us in the concrete business really enjoy it—the material is fascinating, the design and construction keep advancing, and we have great pride in the finished product. But few would voluntarily do the work for free. A recent article in More

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Working for Free

I enjoyed reading your editorial comment in the February issue of Concrete Construction. In response to the question of held retainage, pay-if-paid contracts, and owners that refuse to pay on change orders, I can offer our policy on these issues. Moreuxrqqcrsxeybwdzwucufxsrfqxwttece

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Employee Pay: How Much Is Enough?

There is little argument that the amount we pay our employees is important. What ignites an argument among contractors is just how much to pay. More

Tags: Compensation
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Ten Ways to Cut Workers' Compensation Costs

Because a construction site is a hazardous place, your business can be hit hard with the many direct and indirect costs of nonfatal accidents and injuries including medical expenses, lost productivity, delays and disruptions to work, and administrative costs. More

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Chloride Permeability Testing of Field-Cured Concrete

We're on a job that requires the microsilica concrete to be less than 600 coulombs chloride permeability at 28 days for laboratory-cured specimens and at 80 days for field-cured core samples, as measured in accordance with AASHTO T 277-83. There's a pay r More

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Buy, Lease, or Rent?

The decision to lease or buy is one of economics. With many variables involved in a lease or outright purchase, it is not easy to determine the best deal. When a company leases equipment, it typically uses a financing lease. Normally there is no down payment. The contractor then makes payments to a third party finance company. An alternative is the service or operating lease. Under this lease, the lessor (manufacturer or seller) remains the owner of the property and is responsible for the payments of any taxes or maintenance. This leasing option allows contractors to rent the equipment for a shorter, more flexible period of time. More

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How to Get Paid in Full and on Time

Few industries place as much product in the hands of buyers as far in advance of payment as the construction industry. Late payment is the accepted norm for construction contractors. What's surprising is the blase attitude contractors take toward the payment system. This attitude, along with the system itself, compounds the payment problem for contractors. In the language of most contracts and in the role of most designers, there's an assumption that contractors don't do the work without a gun held to their heads. This creates mistrust. Contractors often feel they have little power to get paid and that entitlement to their money is clouded. They send in their payment requisition, and if the architect disagrees, it's returned with red-lined changes. Then the contractor retypes it, signs it, and sends it to the architect again. This puts the contractor in the passive role of taking what they can get, rather than invoicing customers for services rendered. Changing your payment requisition is saying that you were wrong in the first place. More

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