Zinc

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Zinc corrosion can crack concrete

I understand that the products of reinforcing steel corrosion occupy a greater volume than the original steel. This volume increase exerts tensile stresses in the concrete, causing it to spall. We're considering using galvanized reinforcing steel in which a zinc coating acts as a sacrificial anode, protecting the steel. However, I've heard that zinc also expands when it corrodes. Wouldn't this cause the same problem as steel? Also, what would happen if, rather than using galvanized rebar, you simply added finely divided zinc powder to the mix? Would the rebar be protected? More

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Galvanized rebar

I understand that the products of reinforcing steel corrosion occupy a greater volume than the original steel. This volume increase exerts tensile stresses in the concrete, causing it to spall. We're considering using galvanized reinforcing steel in which a zinc coating acts as a sacrificial anode, protecting the steel. However, I've heard that zinc also expands when it corrodes. Wouldn't this cause the same problem as steel? Also, what would happen if, rather than using galvanized rebar, you simply added finely divided zinc powder to the mix? Would the rebar be protected? More

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Preventing Further Corrosion in Repaired Concrete

A sacrificial coating for rebar may be the solution for a perplexing concrete repair problem--recurrence of corrosion after the repair is made. Zinc-rich epoxy resin protects rebar in the repair zone and in surrounding concrete. The zinc coating allows electrical contact between the bar and the active zinc. Zinc then acts as a sacrificial anode, protecting the steel. More

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Concrete Versus Nonferrous Metals

What is the effect of contact with concrete on such commonly used non-ferrous metals as sheet zinc, lead, copper and aluminum? More

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