This bioswale in Bushwick, Brooklyn, is one of thousands that the New York City Department of Environmental Protection will install  over the next five years.
New York City Department of Environmental Protection This bioswale in Bushwick, Brooklyn, is one of thousands that the New York City Department of Environmental Protection will install over the next five years.

The New York City Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) requested an examination of programs in the U.S. and abroad to help shape its response to the MS4 permit recently issued by the state Department of Environmental Conservation. The result is Innovative and Integrated Stormwater Management, which the Water Research Foundation is distributing as part of its focus on One Water. The partners hope other stormwater managers can use the report to cost-effectively improve local water body health for their communities.

“Protecting public health means preparing our communities for a changing climate, but not every program will work for every municipality,” sayes DEP Acting Commissioner Vincent Sapienza. “We believe this report can serve as a roadmap for communities looking for the right approach to managing stormwater.”

Each chapter covers a program topic, applicable EPA regulations, and common high-interest factors that influence decision-making when it comes to setting up and implementing the program. Within each chapter, case studies are presented for a sampling of the communities with progressive programs in the topic area. Although many are implementing control measures, techniques vary based on conditions specific to their community. Additionally, photos of stormwater management techniques are available on DEP’s Flickr page.