Green Materials

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Regional and Recycled Credits in LEED v4

There are two options for the Sourcing of Raw Materials credit: raw material source and extraction reporting, and leadership extraction practices. More

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FHWA: asphalt recycling up 22%

Public works departments and contractors are using more reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) and recycled asphalt shingles (RAS) than is collected. More

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We test-drive first all-electric vehicle: Navistar's eStar

Public Works columnist Paul Abelson felt like he was driving a pickup, not a Class... More

Taming the Wild West of Concrete Polishing

Within the last year, associations have given polishing contractors firmer ground to stand on when bidding projects, executing work, and explaining their product to customers and specifiers in clear, consistent language. More

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2013 Influencer: Central Concrete Supply Co.

The San Jose, Calif., producer leads the nation in developing Environmental... More

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One World Trade Center Rises with High-Strength Concrete

Eastern Concrete Materials supplied 150,000 cubic yards of ready-mix for One World... More

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Look-a-like Masonry Products Garnering Attention

I’ve included a number of news items in this week’s newsletter about proposed new building products. Activists in the green building movement are increasingly investing their time, talent and treasure in projects to create a new generation of building materials. These innovative products are often units shaped like conventional clay-fired brick and concrete masonry units. And at first glance, these products appear to be less harmful to the environment. But are they viable replacements? More

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Street Smarts: Stiffer Pavements Can Reduce Fuel Use

Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have found that a pavement property called deflection could save more that $15 billion in annual fuel costs and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. More

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Street Smarts: Stiffer Pavements Can Reduce Fuel Use

Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have found that a pavement property called deflection could save more that $15 billion in annual fuel costs and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. More

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